top of page

Why you want to use Spent Mushrooms Substrate (SMS) in your garden and as food for your worms

Mushrooms are a delicious addition to many meals, but did you know that the leftover substrate from mushroom cultivation can also be a valuable resource in your garden? Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) is the leftover material that remains after the mushrooms have been harvested, and it has a wide range of benefits when used as a soil amendment and as food for worms.

SMS is a valuable soil amendment because it is rich in nutrients and organic matter. It is an excellent source of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, three of the most important nutrients for plant growth. It also contains other essential nutrients, such as calcium, magnesium, and sulfur, as well as a range of micronutrients that are important for plant health.



At Northeast Worms we are offering Organic Spent Mushroom Substrate from a local farm. We are offering 10 lbs. bags at a special price. Order your SMS supply HERE When added to the soil, SMS helps to improve soil structure and fertility. It can help to increase the water-holding capacity of the soil, which is especially important in sandy soils that are prone to drying out quickly. SMS also helps to improve soil aeration and drainage, which is important for healthy root growth.

SMS is also a great source of food for worms. Worms are important in the garden because they help to break down organic matter and improve soil structure. When worms eat SMS, they break it down into nutrient-rich castings, which can be used as a fertilizer for plants. Worm castings are an excellent source of nutrients and beneficial microbes that can help to improve soil health and plant growth.



At Northeast Worms we are offering Organic Spent Mushroom Substrate from a local farm. We are offering 10 lbs. bags at a special price. Order your SMS supply HERE In addition to its benefits as a soil amendment and worm food, SMS also has environmental benefits. By using SMS in the garden, you are helping to reduce waste and promote sustainability. SMS is a byproduct of mushroom cultivation, and using it in the garden helps to reduce the amount of waste that goes into landfills. In conclusion, spent mushroom substrate is a valuable resource that can benefit your garden in many ways. It is a rich source of nutrients and organic matter that can help to improve soil structure and fertility. It is also an excellent food source for worms, which can help to improve soil health and plant growth. By using SMS in your garden, you can promote sustainability and reduce waste while improving the health and productivity of your plants.


Indeed, mycelium fungi present in spent mushroom substrate (SMS) is another important benefit worth discussing. Mycelium is the vegetative part of a fungus that grows underground or inside its substrate. The mycelium of the mushroom is what produces the fruiting body (the actual mushroom) that we eat. When the mushroom is harvested, the mycelium that remains in the substrate can continue to grow and colonize the substrate. The mycelium in SMS has many benefits for the garden. First, mycelium can help to break down organic matter in the soil, making it more available to plants. This process is known as mineralization, and it helps to release nutrients from organic matter, making them more available for plant uptake.


In addition, mycelium can help to improve soil structure by producing a network of fine filaments that create channels for air and water to flow through the soil. This improves soil aeration and drainage, which is important for healthy root growth. Mycelium also plays a role in soil health by promoting the growth of beneficial microorganisms. The mycelium produces a range of compounds that help to feed and support the growth of beneficial bacteria and fungi in the soil. This creates a diverse and healthy soil ecosystem that can help to suppress plant diseases and improve plant growth. Finally, mycelium can help to sequester carbon in the soil. The mycelium of some fungi can produce long-lasting carbon compounds that can remain in the soil for years, helping to mitigate climate change by removing carbon from the atmosphere. In conclusion, the mycelium fungi present in spent mushroom substrate is another important benefit worth considering. Mycelium can help to break down organic matter, improve soil structure, promote beneficial microorganisms, and sequester carbon in the soil. By using SMS in your garden, you can harness the power of mycelium to improve soil health and promote sustainable gardening practices.


448 views1 comment

Recent Posts

See All

1 Comment


angusmacduff
angusmacduff
Mar 26, 2023

Years ago - many years - 1952 - we used to be able to get a dump truck full delivered by the farmer for $20.00. Now - those were the good old days. They were happy to get rid of it.


MacDuff

Like
Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page